Return of Perpetual Trophies / Mystery Sailing Event (22nd April)

Just a short message to those members who won Perpetual trophies last season. I’m sorry but it’s time to return them to the club for the 2016/2017 inscriptions. Our current racing season concludes this Saturday 8th April.

Can all class reps please follow-up with your skippers to ensure this occurs prior to Easter. This will give the club time to update the trophies prior to Presentation Night on Saturday 6th May ’17.

Also, keep the 22nd April open for the ADVENTURE SAILING WEEKEND to an exotic location. Sail there, be a passenger on one of the MSC patrol boats or if you want to drive there be at the club early for full disclosure of the destination.

 

Peter White

 

The M.J. Petterson Trophy – The 50th Running of this Classic

What a day for a sail.

No one could have expected the turn of events, the shifting wind, the strength of the breeze then the lack of it that encapsulised a great day to round off the first half of what has been a very good start to the season.

Saturday 19th December commenced with 20-25 knot North West winds that put paid to too much enthusiasm and it appeared like to be another lost day of sailing. The only spark of hope was the Bureau forecast of abating winds in the afternoon.

Again, as we have learnt from probably four previous race days this year:

‘Do not let the morning weather conditions dictate what the afternoon will be.’

This was a classic case here and it wasn’t until 12:30pm that most of the racing fleet that was going to sail turned up.

The Bureau was correct (for a change – excuse the pun), the wind began to ease enough to enable a start to happen.

Due to the severe weather conditions (a possible 41 degrees), the Race Management meeting in the tower decided to deviate from normal tradition and rather than having an off the beach start on a handicap basis, a single start for all was the better option with handicaps being calculated back on land.

It will be back to the normal ‘stern chaser’ format next year as this type of racing is what sets the MJP apart from all other races.

This being a ‘stern chaser’ event, handicaps were calculated for the fleet and this involved looking back over past MJPs, checking current year results for each class and the performance of each boat within that class, discussing with each Class Rep whether to add or subtract one minute here and there.

It is an unconventional method when compared to the pure mathematical approach of using yardsticks and average handicap times but this day it seemed to work well.

Racing use to be all about having boats on the water but nowadays it’s also as much about the volunteers that make it possible in the first place.

Whatever Race Management wants, Race Management gets and a special THANK YOU is directed to all members who assisted out on the water and in the tower to make racing possible.

Out on the race course the wind was flicking a little then a big 90 degree shift to the North East brought up a postponement for 20+ minutes before the wind gradually shifted back to its original position and the countdown began. It was tight at the top mark with all boats rounding within a couple of minutes. Those inshore seemed to benefit the most.

As with a northerly type wind, there were lots of peaks and troughs in the wind strength and wind oscillations. Peter & Colin White had a swim each as did Eliza and Drew (crew’s fault hey Drew). see link to youtube for video summary – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i8bBZqima-g

 

First across the finish line in order were: an Optie, a Contender, aTasar and a Laser a good mix and a good result.

 

Placing       Skipper / Crew    Class           Elapsed Time      Plus Handicap

Junior Division

1                      Declan                        Optie                 36:40                       Not calculated

Declan was announced the winner of the Junior division but was not present to accept.

It was explained that Declan also tried the daring move of attempting to cross the fleet on Port tack at the start and he almost made it until he came across the Flying 15 of Dale Collings.

The atmosphere in the room was electric as the countdown from 10th took place.  There was a paused at 3rd where Greg Gleason looked at Mal Parsons and said

“I’ll tell you the bad news in just a second Mal.”

… at which Mal’s face showed a sign of resignation that he had again missed out on winning the coveted trophy.

Then the announcement – and the winner of the MJ Petterson trophy for season 2015/16, in the time of 58 minutes and 38 seconds is:

MAL PARSONS

Applause came from everywhere and it was sustained as a shocked but very soon jubilant Mal raised his arms in final triumph. After 42 years of trying to win the ‘darn’ trophy Mal had finally did it.

Senior Division

Placing       Skipper / Crew    Class           Elapsed Time      Plus Handicap

10        CC       Elisa Dalton /            Pacer              1:01:23                      1:06:23

Drew Henry

 

9 (DNSO)      Peter White               Sabre                  53:07                      1:00:17

 

8 (DNSO) C  Colin White              Sabre                  52:26                       59.26

 

7 (DNSO) C  Chris Meager                       Laser                  48:17                       59.17

 

6                     Mike Champness      Laser                  48:13                     1:02:13

 

5                     Alan Mollets            Contender          41:49                     1:00:49

 

4                     Dale Collings            Flying 15           43:36                     1:00:36

 

3                     Fergal Cannon          Laser                  45:38                        59:38

 

2                     John Eriksson /         Laser                  42:03                        59:03

Jim Rae

 

 1                     Mal Parsons                         Laser                 47:38                        58:38

 

DNSO = Did not sign on

C         = Capsize

As we can see from above, Mal only won by 25 seconds with the last of the next seven boats only 2 minutes 11 secs behind.

When adding together the elapsed time plus the handicap time, the following comparisons are made:

  • 2nd place through to 9th place was only separated by 2 mins 11 secs
  • 2nd place through to 8th place was only separated by 1 min 46 secs

This shows that the formula used worked very well and will be used as the base line for future MJP events.

 

Peter White

MJP Handicapper

New Mordy Newsletter – Nov 21st Issue#2

Mordy Newsletter – Issue 2

The newest MSC newsletter is available in pdf format. (click above)

Catch-up on what’s happening at Mordialloc Sailing Club.

 

The Mordi Club Newsletter – Issue 115 – 8th November 2014

For further details check out the club’s web site: www.mordiallocsc.com.au/

Ahead in this issue is:

Last week        Interested?      New Editor Required             Balance Your Boat       History Book IV                        Tasar News                             Sabre News

Article on Capsizing               What’s Coming up

 

Last Week

Much of last week’s Newsletter is reproduced this week as a blow-out resulted in only the Tazar association turning up for a training week which was also a blow-out for the Saturday. However, not to be denied, lots of good theory from Glen Collings and Chris Dance kept the audience involved for the day.

 

Interested?

I want to bring to the attention of all members that on 28th February ’15 it will be the 50 year anniversary of Ken Venn and crew Graeme Moor sailing Ken’s Heavy Weight Sharpie (HWS) around the bay, one long weekend in 1965.

It was a 5 day adventure that commenced at 11:00 am at Mordialloc and took them to Sorrento, across the entrance of Port Phillip, across & down to Geelong, then up passed Williamstown to Melbourne and back down to Mordialloc.

They took their own fry pan, billy, stove and eating utensils and slept the nights on the beach next to their boat.

Graeme was a member of some 5 years whilst Ken became Commodore from 1984 to 1986 and also a Life member of the club.

 

To celebrate this occasion, I am looking for interested club members who would like to participate in some sort of ‘around the Bay sail’, just as Ken & Graeme did 50 years ago. Whether it be by HWS, LWS or something smaller is yet to be decided, so at this stage the question is: Are you interested in the concept? and would you be willing to get involved and participate? Ideas are welcome and so will be your support.

If you are interested, please read the History Book I – Chapter ….,  Pages 163 to 165 for the full details of the pioneering journey and contact the Editor with your details.

 

New Editor Required

After 5 years and over 100 editions of the weekly club newsletter, I have decided to step aside as Editor and pass this task on to someone who will be able to keep club members up-to-date with the latest news.

For those who are interested, please contact me (details on the last page) to discuss a hand-over.

 News Flash – Congratulations to Ryan Bargholtz for being kind enough to take on the role of Newsletter Editor for the club. Ryan will produce his first newsletter as Issue 117, two weeks from today (Issue 115 – 8th Nov). Please give Ryan your full support as takes on these duties – an article or two from members is always welcome by the Editor.   

 

Balance Your Boat – Continued

Changing balanceBalance is dynamic. It shifts with wind strength and angle, sail trim and shape, angle of heel, and position of weight. You can adjust many of these variables to fine-tune the helm and improve the overall performance of your boat.You can raise or lower the centreboard if you have one, change sail trim and shape, move crew weight, and shift the position of your sails by moving the mast. These strategies fall into two major categories: (1) moving the centre of effort fore and aft and (2) moving the centre of lateral resistance fore and aft.

Centreboard.

If your boat has a centreboard, you can use it in combination with sail trim and weight placement to adjust balance. When you raise the centreboard, the boat’s centre of lateral resistance moves aft, reducing weather helm (Fig. 2).

Figure 2: Changing the shape of the boat below the water is another way to adjust balance. Heeling the boat to leeward creates a hull shape that turns the boat into the wind, increasing weather helm. Shifting crew weight to reduce heel will also reduce weather helm by making the underwater surface more symmetrical. On centreboard boats, you can lower and raise the board to move the centre of lateral resistance (CLR). To reduce weather helm, raise the centreboard to move the centre of lateral resistance aft.

 

Shift weight.

You can move crew weight to adjust balance. An upright boat presents a neutral, symmetrical shape to the water, but as a boat heels, the hull shape loses its symmetry and forces the boat to turn (Fig. 2). The larger curve on the leeward side pushes the bow to windward, increasing weather helm. The greater the heel, the greater the push to windward.

In addition, the sails and centre of effort move outboard as the boat heels. This gives the centre of effort more power over the centre of lateral resistance and adds weather helm. As the wind builds and weather helm increases, move crew weight to the windward rail to reduce heel and weather helm.

Conversely, if you experience lee helm in light air, shift crew weight to leeward to heel the boat and build weather helm. Remember, make small changes in weight placement and check the effect on your helm each time.

Sail trim.

The trim and shape of your sails determine the position of the boat’s centre of effort. When you feel excessive weather helm through the rudder, the sails’ centre of effort is too far behind the centre of lateral resistance. Moving the centre of effort forward reduces weather helm. To do this, either decrease the power of the main or increase that of the headsail. You can ease the mainsheet and boomvang, flatten the sail by tightening outhaul and cunningham, or trim the jib. In high winds, reduce mainsail area with a reef.

You correct lee helm with the opposite strategy: Move the centre of effort aft. Trim the mainsheet and boomvang and ease the outhaul and cunningham to increase the main’s power. Ease the jib to reduce sail power forward.

If you have a lot of weather helm sailing to windward, check the shape of your mainsail. The draft of a sail tends to move aft in heavy wind. This hooks the trailing edge, or leech, of the sail to windward, increasing weather helm (Fig. 3). To correct this problem, pull the draft forward by tightening the cunningham and flatten the sail by tightening the outhaul. You can also ease the mainsheet and boomvang.

Change the mast rake. You can also change the angle, or rake, of the mast, moving the total sail area, or sail plan, forward or aft (Fig. 3). Raking the mast toward the stern moves the centre of effort aft relative to the centre of lateral resistance and reduces lee helm. Do this by loosening the headstay and tightening the shrouds and backstay If you have weather helm, rake the mast forward. Always make small adjustments and test the results under sail.

Figure 3: You can fine-tune your boat’s balance by raking your mast forward and aft. Angling the mast aft will move the centre of effort aft and increase weather helm. If the wind comes up and weather helm increases, check the shape of the mainsail. Wind deflected off a tight leech will slow the boat and add to weather helm.

Listen to your helm

As you work to achieve balance, remember your rudder is the best gauge of the boat’s performance. Feel the pressure against the tiller, make small, individual adjustments, and monitor their effects. Eventually you’ll become more familiar with the characteristics of your boat, and you’ll be able to achieve balance and optimum performance quickly and confidently when sailing to windward.

Contribution provided by Sailing Technique Specialist Reporter Colin White

 

History Book IV – On Sale

Book IV of the History of MSC spanning the years 2001 to 2010 is on sale for $40 each, remembering that it is a fund raising event for the Junior development program which will help your kids (if applicable) enjoy their sailing and learn about the sport.

Copies of Book I (2nd print), II & III are also available – please support your club by buying a copy now.

 

Tasar Class Report

If you were wondering where all the Tasars members were this summer, then Dave Emslie’s report will bring you up to date.

‘There has been a lot of Tasar activity centred around the upcoming world championships in Busselton in WA in the new year for which there are already 120+ entries from Australia, the USA, Japan the UK and NZ which illustrates the depth and strength of the Tasar class.

Representing Mordialloc SC will be David Elmslie and Holly Savage, Ian Scholes and Doina Canta and new members Ludovic and Marie Labat as well as an old young member with a well know  tasar surname  – James Sly with crew Chelsea Haynes, who is making the trip to see if he can improve on his old man’s 13th in the Phuket Worlds in 07. It’s great to see such an accomplished young sailor as James having a crack at the class and this can only improve its profile. Mordy Tasar Stalwart Tony Hammond has sold ‘Me’ntone’ to Doina Canta and it will be raced in Busselton by Tony’s old crew Dan Canta (son of Doina) who is fitting in the worlds in between his training to be the youngest swimmer to cross the English Channel next year.

James, sailing a collection of borrowed boats managed to narrowly come second to Chris Dance in the hotly contested Mordy winter series where there was a great roll up of Tasars all focussing on their worlds preparation.’

Contribution provided by Tasar Class Reporter David Elmslie

 

Laser Class News

The Radial fleet was absent from Mordi last week for a variety of reasons, apart from the condiyions:

Mike – visiting father in NZ

Chris – 4WD and fishing in Robe SA

George – break with family in Echuca

Nev – Banned from physical activity by his doctor temporarily

Steve and Mal – Travelled to Albury Wodonga Yacht Club for “Sail Country 2014”

Sail Country is one of the regattas this year that makes up the OTB Marine Victorian Sailing Cup – a YV series for Juniors and Youth.  Total entries were 120+ with 35 of them being Lasers.  (Full rigs 5;  Radial 13;  4.7   17)

Racing was on Saturday afternoon and Sunday morning.   Saturday started out as 10 knots but soon became 20+ knots.  Four races were conducted.  Mal did better than Steve in this big breeze.  He had a second in race 2 – well done.

Sunday saw us waiting on the water for the breeze to build from 3 knots and settle – not all that much fun when the temperature was 5 degrees 2 hours earlier.   Three races were conducted in 10 knots before the 1pm deadline.  Steve’s performance was better in these winds and he finished first in the second race of the morning.

Overall Mal finished in 5th on 30 points with Steve in 8th on 33 points.

Albury Wodonga Yacht Club was very organized on and off water and we enjoyed our trip and the on-site camping.

Contribution provided by Laser Class Reporter Steve Griffith

 

Sabre News

The date is not fixed for this event but we are looking at the 14th or 21st March 2015. This still has to be confirmed with Mordialloc who traditionally host the event.  The new format for the race which was tried last year will be repeated so everyone will be in with a chance of a victory.

McCrae Yacht Club will host this seasons Victorian Sabre Championships on the 4th and 5th of Feb 2015.

 

Next Week – An article on Capsizing by Colin White

Last weekend Colin had the misfortune to capsize to windward on the reach during the second race. As Col scrambled to work out what had happened and where he was, he could hear the laughs as the other Sabres sailed past (yes, the editor was one).

Now with the mast and sail on the windward side of the boat, if Col tried to right it, the boat would simply flop over with the mast smacking back into the water on the other side. We have all experienced this on more than one occasion.

So what can be done to avoid this? What other option(s) do sailors have when faced with this situation?

Well, Colin decided to have a roll!

Does anyone know what Colin means by this? More on this technique in next week’s newsletter.

Contribution provided by Sailing Technique Specialist Reporter Colin White

 

What’s Coming Up

  • Saturday 8th November 2014 – Green Fleet, Open Optis, Radials and Tackers 2, Club Summer Series
  • J. Petterson and ‘M’ Trophies
  • Saturday 15th November 2014 – Green Fleet, Open Optis, Radials and Tackers 2, Club Summer Series
  • Saturday 22nd November 2014 – Green Fleet, Open Optis, Radials and Tackers 2, Club Summer Series
  • Saturday 29th November 2014 – Green Fleet, Open Optis, Radials and Club Summer Series
  • Saturday 6th December 2014 – Green Fleet, Open Optis, Radials and R/C Summer Sprint series

6th December – Christmas Party
If you have any unwanted Christmas decorations MSC would be happy to take them off your hands. Christmas raffle donations also appreciated  at the office.

  • Saturday 13th December 2014 – Green Fleet, Open Optis, Radials and R/C Summer Sprint series
  • Saturday 20th December 2014 – Green Fleet, Open Optis, Opti Parents Race, Radials and R/C Summer Sprint series
  • Trivia Night 14th March 2015.

 

Newsletter deadline

The ‘stop’ date for all articles is Mid-day every Wednesday

Photos to include JPG format.

The Editor’s Contact Details:

My email address is:  peter.d.white@boeing.com

Peter White  –  Sabre 1750

Ph: 9647-3794 (Bus)

See the Mordialloc website: www.mordiallocsc.com.au/

 

The History of Mordialloc Sailing Club – Book IV

After a delay of several weeks, Book IV (2000-2010) has been printed and was picked up on Thursday 15th May. Unfortunately it was not available for Presentation Night but the half printed sample copies did provided an indication of what was in the book.

It contains many, many photos, the 2008 470 Worlds and all the events of the era. Further, it contains ALL the statistics you would ever want to include and if you have ever been a member of one of the committees or have won a Perpetual trophy, your name will be in the book and possibly on more than one occasion, especially if you have provided great effort and support to the club over this period.

A number of orders were taken on the night and these plus orders received from 15th May onwards can be collected and paid for (where applicable) from 7:00 pm (which is prior to), and at the upcoming AGM on Friday 27th June.

Remember, this is a fund raising effort for the club’s junior sailors, so please support the effort by buying a copy @ $40 each.

See my contact details below.

 

Regards
Peter White

Finance – Accounts Receivable
Boeing Aerostructures Australia
Phone: 61 – 3 – 9647-3794
Fax: 61 – 3 – 9647-3932
Email:  peter.d.white@boeing.com

Mobile:   0466-27-27-22

Mordi Newsletter 12th April ’14 – Issue 109

The Mordi Club Newsletter           19th April 2014

 

Volume 5  –  No. 21                                                             Issue 109             

For further details check out the club’s web site: www.mordiallocsc.com.au/

Ahead in this issue is:

Working Bee     Coffee Cruise                       Keep the Day Free                Sabre Report

Sailing Skills    Women & Girls in Sailing   What’s Coming up

Working Bee

It was a well attended working bee by club members that commenced at 8:00am and went through to around 11:00am last Saturday. The storage compound was cleared of all boats, mowed and cleared of debris and bits and pieces before returning the boats, hopefully to their previous positions. The driveway near the lane was levelled, the patrol boats had some TLC and many other around the club activities took place. Well done to all those who contributed. Photos courtesy of Drew Henry.

boat outside yard yard

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

… and out they go, ahead of the clean up.   The clean up taking place with Peter Bargholtz on the mower in the back ground and Gordon at left.

Coffee Cruise – Commences at 10:00 am for a trip to Edithvale Life Saving Club – Be there any way you can.

“Keep The Day Free Notice” – Presentation Hawaiian Night

Please keep the 3rd May free for the end of year Presentations. It is the culmination of the years sailing and recognition to those who have participated in the years events.

This year will be an Hawaiian theme, so come dress appropriately, everyone else will. It all makes for a fun night.

To assist with the night, please advise Cassy Rae or Peter Bargholz if you can provide any suitable Hawaiian decorations that can be loaned to the club for the night to decorate the hall – it would be most appreciated and save buying same.

If last year’s event was any indication, 2014 will be terrific.

Prices are: Adults        $20      Secondary Kids          $15      Primary            $10

… and younger than Primary are Free

This will include a Spit Roast (vegetarian option is available but please advise the club on payment of before).

You can pay early at the canteen or book and pay online at: www.trybooking.com/erkw

Unfortunately, due to catering purposes, bookings CANNOT be taken on the day.

The day will also include (hopefully) a presentation to the club via Ken Raphael of Book IV of the History Mordialloc Sailing Club – 2001 to 2010. The book will be on sale for $40 each, remembering that it is a fund raising event for the Junior development program which will help your kids (if applicable) enjoy their sailing more and learn about the sport. The poor writer gets nothing J.

Sabre Report

Six Sabres (Drew, Rod, Darrell, Tony, Colin & Peter W.) fronted for the second last Saturday of the season. Close racing was enjoyed by all with Colin White taking the lead in both races from the start line and was never really seriously challenged, although Drew Henry kept Colin honest. Rod, Darrell and Tony competed well in the new format that kept the boats closer together than otherwise.

As emailed to all, it is encouraged that all Sabres sailors make an effort to attend the COFFEE CRUISE  and the last race for the season, this weekend.

Sailing Skills Article

This is the second of four articles submitted by Colin White- source –The Internet.

Boatspeed

Best speed is achieved by ones ability to find the right combination of the following variables Variables Out of Your Control Variables You Control Wind Waves Opponents action Course steered Sail trim Boat balance (including rudder/centreboard

The key to boat speed is feel. Feel is achieved through a combination of sail trim, boat balance and course steered which results in the correct amount of weather helm feel for any given wind and wave condition.

To Increase Weather Helm Feel By(or decrease by using opposite of below)

Move body weight forward. Move body weight to leeward. Sheet boom further to windward. Sheet tighter on mainsail leach. Ease off outhaul for fuller mainsail . Ease off cunningham so draft moves aft. Straighten mast by reducing pre-bend for fuller mainsail. Move centreboard forward. Rake rudder more aft. Steer a course further away from wind than the sails are trimmed for or the boat is balanced for.

The key to top speed is how you use your natural feel to mix these ingredients in the right combination. Once out on the race course this mix of course steered, sail trim and boat balance is the difference between being fast or slow.

Natural feel can really only be learnt by time spent sailing (especially in small dinghies starting at an early age). A sailor with feel will automatically make adjustments without even knowing the reasons. The late starter may have to think why a certain adjustment is necessary.

For the best results you need to combine natural feel with a good understanding of what is fast and the reasons some combinations work better than others. What is obvious is that variables – course steered, sail trim and boat balance are all completely dependent upon each other for best speed.

Light wind Boat speed 0-5 knots

Upwind: The key points are to increase weather helm and create efficient wind flow over sails. Body and helm movements must be super smooth so as not to disturb wind and water flow. It is critical to remain calm, both mentally and physically (this is not easy as you often have to remain in the same position for long periods).

1. Use mast pre-bend and outhaul to flatten mainsail.

2. Tighter rig tension will pre-bend the mast (for dinghies) or ease rig tension to power up head sail for racing keelboats.

3. Have both jib and main luffs eased to create a few horizontal wrinkles, allowing the draft to move aft for better light air sail shapes.

4. Sheet both main and jib with twist to leeward on leaches to help wind flow.

5. Be careful not to over sheet the boom. Use the boom well off the centre line in very light breezes and only when sure of your boat speed, attempt to sheet further inboard. Boom down for further drive.

6. Keep jib slot open and flowing, remember boom is further to leeward than usual.

7. Rake rudder aft and centreboard maximum forward to increase weather helm feel.

8. Position crew weight to leeward and forward to create more weather helm and reduce wetted hull surface. Crew should be careful not to disturb wind flow in the slot between the jib and mainsail.

Try to steer by watching wrinkles along the jib luff (on monotypes, the main) allowing them to be slightly back winding for best flow. Try to create correct weather helm feel by careful use of body movement. Don’t allow the helm to go dead by flattening out leeward helm. Try to balance the boat for light airs using rudder and centreboard positioning, rather than having to use too much leeward heel to achieve the desired weather helm feel.

Reaching: The same principles apply as for upwind, i.e. best wind flow by having luff wrinkles slightly backing, combined with good helm feel. For double handed boats the key is your use of the spinnaker and pole height combined with course steered.

You need to position the pole higher when tight reaching as this opens up the spinnaker luff allowing you to point up higher into the wind. If your course is low then your pole height must also be low in order to keep the spinnaker filling. The helmsman must then decide just how low he can afford to steer and still fill the spinnaker. Good communication with the trimmer. The helmsman must be able to subconsciously feel the weight of the spinnaker sheet. The weight decreases to the point of the spinnaker collapsing, then the helmsman must steer a slightly higher course and maintain the balance between good speed and best course to mark. Using the variations in wind speed is critical to fast reaching legs i.e. pointing down in the puffs and up in the lulls.

Running: In very light airs running utilizes the same principles as broad reaching or low course reaches, finding the right combination of boat speed versus best course to mark. As wind increases your gybing angles should become smaller, allowing you to steer more directly downwind.

Women & Girls in Sailing

Contribution provided by Eminent Major Events Reporter Sarah Livesey

(See posters around the club/contact Cassy/Ann-Maree)

  • 6th April & 31st May – One day leadership training @ The Boat Shed – Albert Park – Contact YV or The Boat Shed
  • Start Powerboat Course – www.boatingvistoria.com.au P= 9597-0066

What’s Coming Up

  • Saturday 12th April 2014 – Green Fleet, Club Summer Series + COFFEE CRUISE + SCHOOL HOLIDAY PROGRAM for 4 days
  • Saturday 19th April 2014 – Easter Break – No sailing
  • Saturday 26th April 2014 – ANZAC DAY
  • Saturday 3rd May 2014 – Special events and Presentation Afternoon/Evening – Bookings open from 5th April through the Canteen and on-line. Details to be provided.

Newsletter deadline

The ‘stop’ date for all articles is Mid-day every Wednesday

Photos to include JPG format.

The Editor’s Contact Details:

My email address is:  peter.d.white@boeing.com

Peter White  –  Sabre 1750

Ph: 9647-3794 (Bus)               0466 27 27 22 (m)

See the Mordialloc website: www.mordiallocsc.com.au/

 

 

 

Michael Parks wins Lidgett Trophy

 

Micheal Trophies

 

I don’t know how we missed this one back in February but we can’t keep a good story down. Our very own Michael Parks won the Lidgett Trophy for Advanced Optimists held at Davey’s Bay Yacht Club. This event is a long standing junior sailing regatta that attracts big fleets and the best sailors from across Victoria.

Held over two days there was tight racing in the Advanced Optimists fleet with race wins spread all the way to 15th place overall. But in the end Michael came out on top over 8 races by having the most consistent results winning by just 2 points.

Well done Michael! We are all very proud of you.

Mordi Newsletter – 5th April ’14 *Issue 107

The Mordi Club Newsletter                                         5th April 2014

Volume 5  –  No. 19                                                              Issue 107                                                                 

For further details check out the club’s web site: www.mordiallocsc.com.au/

Ahead in this issue is:

Sabre Teams Race    Working Bee      Keep the Day Free                The Tackers

Ted’s Day out           Sailing Skills     Laser Report                          Women & Girls in Sailing                   What’s Coming up

Sabre Teams Race

The Sabre Teams Race winners – See the full story on page 2.

IMG_1083

 

 

 

 

 

 

The eventual winners were from Yellow Team: Chris Dance (Capt), James Nolan, Geoff dresser, Drew Henry (Mordi) and Greg Heins (Mordi).

A good turnout of some 25 sabres saw, for the first time, 5 teams selected from a hat as opposed to ‘club’ teams where Black Rock were the usual winners. It was just a matter of how far. Green, Red, Blue, Yellow and a no colour team were drawn at lunch time with the prospect of three short course races if the weather continued to filter in.

IMG_0972 (2)

 

 

 

A great photo by Richard Lozell as the mid-fleet round the wing mark.

Darrell, Rod, Tony, Drew, Greg, Peter M, John Hutton and Peter W were Mordi’s representatives in the fleet. Drew was the stand out with all three races in the top 5. Three races did eventuate in a slow swinging breeze which got to 7-10 knots in the middle of race two but began to fade slowly during the latter part of race 3.

Here is a link to photos from last weekend’s team racing.

https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.611864548902059.1073741857.112850475470138&type=3

Working Bee

Please be aware of the club Working Bee commencing at 8:00 am on Saturday 5th April. Bring the usual implements & ‘things’ to assist your club in maintaining a healthy look. This helps keep the fees low and attract new members. So PLEASE BE THERE.

“Keep The Day Free Notice” – Presentation Hawaiian Night

Please keep the 3rd May free for the end of year Presentations. It is the culmination of the years sailing and recognition to those who have participated in the years events.

This year will be an Hawaiian theme, so come dress appropriately, everyone else will. It all makes for a fun night.

To assist with the night, please advise Cassy Rae or Peter Bargholz if you can provide any suitable Hawaiian decorations that can be loaned to the club for the night to decorate the hall – it would be most appreciated and save buying same.

If last year’s event was any indication, 2014 will be terrific.

Prices are: Adults        $20      Secondary Kids          $15      Primary            $10

… and younger than Primary are Free

This will include a Spit Roast (vegetarian option is available but please advise the club on payment of before).

You can pay early at the canteen or book and pay online at: www.trybooking.com/erkw

Unfortunately, due to catering purposes, bookings CANNOT be taken on the day.

The day will also include (hopefully) a presentation to the club via Ken Raphael of Book IV of the History Mordialloc Sailing Club – 2001 to 2010. The book will be on sale for $40 each, remembering that it is a fund raising event for the Junior development program which will help your kids (if applicable) enjoy their sailing more and learn about the sport. The poor writer gets nothing J.

The Tackers

The Tackers 1 and Tackers 3 programs come to a conclusion this Saturday 5th April.

A presentation of certificates happens from 11am for Tackers 1 (Senior members are requested to be present) and from 3pm for Tackers 3 groups.

This seasons Tackers 1 group is the largest we have had with 22 Tackers all having a FUN Time with lots of games, making new friendships and along the way learning that sailing can be a lot of FUN.  It is amazing on a warm day how much they just want to go out and capsize or simply ‘accidentally’ fall overboard so they can test those buoyancy vests.

And when there is no wind they still have heaps of fun just paddling around.

The Tackers 3 group have had some challenging conditions with the occasional standout efforts.

This group are now keen to find out about the Green Fleet program which follows on after the Tackers Program.

Our Instructors have done a fabulous job keeping the Tackers happy, safe and keen to want to come back for more sailing fun.

My thanks to Andy Rae, Kristy Sly, James Sly and Eloise Silvester who ran Tackers 1 and 3 plus Gemma Burns, Ton Dwyer and Jordan Sunkell-Lozel who also assisted with Tackers 1.

SONY DSC

 

 

 

 

 

 

On behalf of the whole club, the members would like to sincerely thank all those named above for their wonderful contribution and effort during the season. The health of the junior division which has come a long way in the last few years is a major priority for this club. Perhaps when we look back to this period in the years to come, it will be considered a cornerstone for the Mordialloc Sailing Club.

Ted’s Day out

Ted did not want to be left out of the Teams Race, so instead he brought down his Finn in what Ted said my be his last sail in his beloved Finn.

Of course we all know the great history behind THIS Finn, being the boat that won the 1956 Gold medal in the Finn Dinghy for the greatest sailor of all time Paul Elstrom.

photo 1 photo 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ted came to MSC about 1995 from Parkdale YC. because of the easier launching and purchased Harry McGuie’s old Sabre – so that makes it 20 seasons at MSC. Ted originally started in 1959 at Hobson’s Bay YC for a year or two with KA27 – See the photo above, then moved on to RYCV from 1960 to 1980 and then joined PYC in 1981 with the Finn and a 125.

You can’t keep a good man down as Ted stated last Saturday “Still, the recent sail was so satisfying that I’m hopeful of perhaps one more outing this year.

Sailing Skills Article

This is the second of four articles submitted by Colin White- source –The Internet.

Tactics – Golden Rules

Avoid being blanketed. Avoid the hopeless position. Avoid being lee – bowed. Start near the forward (upwind) end of the start line. Ignore the position of the windward mark when deciding where to start (provided the first leg is a beat). Keep in the front rank before the start. Take a transit so you know when you are on the line. Keep between your opponent and the next mark. Off wind, keep your wind clear and try to sail straight for the next mark.

Strategy – Golden Rules

When it comes to which part of the race course to sail to there are some golden rules. Follow the below rules of thumb to maximise your chances of racing success. On a short beat keep to the right – hand side of the course. Find out which way the current or tide is flowing. Head for deep water and the outside of bends when the tide is with you (the opposite when the tide is against you). If everything is equal, tack up a 60 – degree cone. Stay well inside the lay lines. Tack on headers. Sail towards the centres of wind bends. On a one – sided beat, sail the long leg first. When sailing cross – tide, point into the tide and use a transit to sail a straight course “over the land”.

Gybe on wind shifts. Choose the gybe that takes you most directly to the leeward mark. Keep strong tides under your lee bow. Go for the downwind end of the finish line.

Sailing Techniques

Body Position

Your hiking position in the boat is important. Try to keep the boat level both fore and aft, as body weight too far forward causes the bow to nosedive and too far back creates turbulence off the stern, which slows you down. This applies up and down wind. In light winds it pays to sit as far forward in the boat as you can (i.e. on the deck), this reduces wetted area and thus less water surface friction is obtained.

Steering Over Waves

Push your tiller away from you as you go up and over the wave and pull your tiller towards you when going down the other side. This can gain you a lot of ground over a full race.

Steering Downwind

Downwind steering is just as important as upwind steering. As you surf down the wave face, steer towards the lowest part of the wave ahead.

Working the Boat

You should never stop working the boat from the time the starting gun goes until the end of the race. You should keep working the mainsheet, steering over waves and moving your body to keep the boat flat. Also looking for wind shifts, tide movements and other boats around you. If you can do all that together and be efficient at it, you will become a winner, and that is what yacht racing is all about.

Laser Report

You may well have noticed the lack of Full and Radial lasers sailing at Mordi last weekend.   This was due to their attendance at the Victorian Masters Championships that were conducted at Port Melbourne Yacht Club.   All 5 races were in 4-8 knot southerlies.   The overall numbers that attended were down (17 Radials & 11 Full rigs)   possibly due to the very busy Laser schedule since Christmas:

  • December – Aust Championships at McCrae
  • February – Aust Masters Championships at Paynesville
  • March – Open State Championships at Mordialloc.

The three Mordi Radials that sailed were all in the 55-64 age bracket.  Mal Parsons was a very credible 2nd , Steve Griffiths  5th and Chris Meager 6th . Racing was very close and many places were won or lost during each race.

The only Mordi Full rig was Tom Rosoman who was the winner of the series – well done.   Nev did not attend as he headed overseas on 31 March and Mike was busy entertaining family from the UK.

“Dry White”

Contribution provided by Laser Class Reporter Stephen Griffiths

Women & Girls in Sailing

Contribution provided by Eminent Major Events Reporter Sarah Livesey

(See posters around the club/contact Cassy/Ann-Maree)

  • 6th April & 31st May – One day leadership training @ The Boat Shed – Albert Park – Contact YV or The Boat Shed
  • Start Powerboat Course – www.boatingvistoria.com.au P= 9597-0066

What’s Coming Up

  • Saturday 29th March 2014 – Tackers 1 & 3, Green Fleet, Laser 4.7 & Opti Coaching, Club Summer Series + SABRE Teams Racing
  • Saturday 5th April 2014 – Tackers 1 & 3, Green Fleet, Laser 4.7 & Opti Coaching, Club Summer Series + WORKING BEE @ 8:00AM
  • Saturday 12th April 2014 – Green Fleet, Club Summer Series + COFFEE CRUISE + SCHOOL HOLIDAY PROGRAM for 4 days

 

  • Saturday 19th April 2014 – Easter Break – No sailing
  • Saturday 26th April 2014 – ANZAC DAY
  • Saturday 3rd May 2014 – Special events and Presentation Afternoon/Evening – Bookings open from 5th April through the Canteen and on-line. Details to be provided.

Newsletter deadline

The ‘stop’ date for all articles is Mid-day every Wednesday

Photos to include JPG format.

The Editor’s Contact Details:

My email address is:  peter.d.white@boeing.com

Peter White  –  Sabre 1750

Ph: 9647-3794 (Bus)               0466 27 27 22 (m)

See the Mordialloc website: www.mordiallocsc.com.au/

Mordi Newsletter 29th March ’14 – Issue 106

The Mordi Club Newsletter          29th March 2014

Volume 5  –  No. 18                                                              Issue 106                                                          

For further details check out the club’s web site: www.mordiallocsc.com.au/

Ahead in this issue is:

Sabre Teams Race       White’s Rescue Service          Never Laugh too soon

Women & Girls in Sailing       Sailing Skills               Keep the Day Free

What’s Coming Up

Welcome to the Sabre Fleet

A warm welcome is extended to the Sabre fleet for the annual John Seeber Memorial Sabre Teams Race with an expected 30 + boats in attendance. The formatting may be a little different to previous years with rumours circulating that teams may be drawn from a hat and placed into balanced teams to give the day more interest. This way no-one knows who has won until the results are totalled at the end of the day’s proceedings – but it’s only a rumour at this stage.

We should also stop to recall the contribution that John made to the association and especially to this regatta – a gentleman.

White’s Rescue Service Incorporated (WRSI) and the Coffee Cruise

Five Sabres (Rod, Colin John, & Peter) and a Mirror – Chris, were ready to leave the beach at 10:10 am when Colin noticed a capsized Laser that had earlier gone in backwards, was now heading dangerously close to the rock wall.

The Sabre boys had to rush over quickly to assist as both Colin and Peter jumped into the water. Colin pushed the Laser over to Starboard tack and as the Laser skipper changed position, he was able to pull on the main sheet and gain enough power to start sailing away from the rock wall – a very close call.

Peter held on to the back of the boat to stop it rolling in the rough surf as it headed to shore. The free ride was also to avoid being washed up on the rocks.

Now that Colin & Peter were both wet through, they also had the enjoyment of doing a 5 km beat down to Edithvale for the Coffee Cruise.

However Chris in his Mirror had trouble in the first 300 metres with the clue of the sail coming undone, so Colin, hoping to be a hero again, twice in one day, went back to assist. The Mirror then capsized and so Colin gave moral support whilst Chris tried to fix it. After this, Chris hit the shore, fixed the problem and headed back out to continue his journey to Edithvale. It was a mighty fine effort as the other sabres were now half way to the Cafe.

On arrival at the Cafe, a warm corner of the with a gas radiator was quickly found and hot coffee was ordered as Colin arrived. The group had a good hour 15 mins before Chris finally arrived and he sat down with us for a very well deserved hot coffee.

With a quick trip back on a tail wind, the party did not leave the beach until 12:30 pm and all were back at MSC within 20 mins ready for the afternoon racing.

Please note:- Bookings are available by appointment only with WRSI who are specialists in Rock wall rescues. Phone: 555-5555. We deliver J

Working Bee

Please be aware of the club Working Bee commencing at 8:00 am on Saturday 5th April. Bring the usual implements & ‘things’ to assist your club in maintaining a healthy look. This helps keep the fees low and attract new members. So PLEASE BE THERE.

On the theme of “Never Laugh to soon” or “He who laughs last laughs best”

On the first run of the second race, Colin White in the Sabre, was leading the fleet and concentrating hard on catching some good waves to stay there. At this point ‘our esteemed Commodore’ in a Laser past Colin to leeward and Colin heard in his own mind – “Richard Basehart” from the old TV show “Voyage to the Bottom of the sea” call out, “DIVE, DIVE, DIVE, as he watched Brett try to use his Laser to search the bottom of Port Phillip for scallops. This gave Col a bit of a laugh once Brett re-surfaced. However, not 1 minute later Colin got a bad cramp in his leg and had to try and stand up to straighten it out. And yes, you guessed it, Colin went in backwards and the last thing he heard was laughter from a Laser now full to the brim with water fading off in the distance.

Epilogue – Colin managed to right the Sabre quick enough that he did not lose a single place.

Women & Girls in Sailing

Contribution provided by Eminent Major Events Reporter Sarah Livesey

(See posters around the club/contact Cassy/Ann-Maree)

  • 6th April & 31st May – One day leadership training @ The Boat Shed – Albert Park – Contact YV or The Boat Shed
  • Start Powerboat Course – www.boatingvistoria.com.au P= 9597-0066

Sailing Skills Article

This is the second of four articles submitted by Colin White- source –The Internet.

Sailing Downwind

You need to spend many hours racing competitively to develop the skills in reaching and running in an effort to get an edge on your competition off the wind.

To be fast off the wind requires you to develop a “feel” for the yacht and what makes it go. A lot of off the wind sailing cannot be taught by a coach it requires you to go out and find out for yourself. A coach can help you with pumping, body position, vang tension, mainsheet position and the height of your centreboard. It is very hard to teach the skill of steering your yacht correctly, by making the most of the wind and the waves.

Body Position

Body position is very important because if the boat is trimmed properly it will always be travelling the most efficiently. This means moving backwards and forwards in the boat as the wind increases and decreases. As soon as the bow begins to drop or the stern drags too much the boat will not be driving at its full speed. Unless the boat is planning you need to try and keep the boat as level as possible fore and aft. As soon as the boat gets up on the plane you can move your body weight right back quickly so there is less wetted surface.

Centreboard Height

It is very important to pull the centreboard up off the wind to reduce drag. Flat off in light winds there should be no centreboard in the water at all.

Vang Tension

Vang tension is vital off the wind to set up correctly and to prevent the boat from getting the death rolls particularly on the run. Flat off in strong winds and a lack of vang tension can often end up with a swim when the boat death rolls. The leech of the sail gets in front of the mast if there is not enough tension applied and contributes to the death rolls and makes gybing difficult. On the flat off the mainsheet can be used to stop the death rolls by over sheeting as the yacht starts to roll. Push your centreboard down further should the yacht roll around a lot. In light winds it is better to have twist in the leech so the wind can flow off the sail easily. As the wind increases you need to use more and more vang tension so that the leech does not open up to much.

Pumping

Pumping is a good method of accelerating the boat down the waves or getting the boat up on the plane or pulling the bow out of a wave. It is most effective when there is the greatest pressure on the sail.

Strategically Downwind Sailing is Like the Beats Maximise your speed. Sail the longer gybe first. Avoid the lay lines and corners. Sailing the puffs and avoid the lulls. Sail the shifts. Watch the current. Keep clear air. If boats spread out, if ahead check what following boats are doing.

Finishing Remember the race isn’t over till the finish! Don’t jam the boat (pinching, over sheeting) keep calm. Sail the shifts (don’t get out of synch). Is the committee boat putting out a wind shadow? (take care if it’s a large launch or yacht). The finishing line can be biased just as much as a start line. Decide on the favoured end while sailing downwind. Try to push your opposition to the unfavoured end of the finish line. If in front: cover, stay between the competition and the mark. Cover hard if necessary. If behind, make those in front work for their place. Don’t just follow them and hope something happens take a risk it may come off but even if it doesn’t what have you lost.

Contribution provided by Technical Skills Expert Reporter Colin White 

 “Keep The Day Free Notice” – Presentation Afternoon/Night

Please keep this date free for the end of year Presentations. It is the culmination of the years sailing and recognition to those who have participated in the years events.

If last year’s event was any indication, 2014 will be terrific. More details will be provided over the next few weeks

The day will also include (hopefully) a presentation to the club via Ken Raphael of Book IV of the History Mordialloc Sailing Club – 2001 to 2010. The book will be on sale for $40 each, remembering that it is a fund raising event for the Junior development program which will help your kids (if applicable) enjoy their sailing more and learn about the sport. The poor writer gets nothing J.

What’s Coming Up

  • Saturday 29th March 2014 – Tackers 1 & 3, Green Fleet, Laser 4.7 & Opti Coaching, Club Summer Series + SABRE Teams Racing
  • Saturday 5th April 2014 – Tackers 1 & 3, Green Fleet, Laser 4.7 & Opti Coaching, Club Summer Series + WORKING BEE @ 8:00AM
  • Saturday 12th April 2014 – Green Fleet, Club Summer Series + COFFEE CRUISE + SCHOOL HOLIDAY PROGRAM for 4 days
  • Saturday 19th April 2014 – Easter Break – No sailing
  • Saturday 26th April 2014 – ANZAC DAY
  • Saturday 3rd May 2014 – Special events and Presentation Afternoon/Evening – Bookings open from 5th April through the Canteen and on-line. Details to be provided.

Newsletter deadline

The ‘stop’ date for all articles is Mid-day every Wednesday

Photos to include JPG format.

The Editor’s Contact Details:

My email address is:  peter.d.white@boeing.com

Peter White  –  Sabre 1750

Ph: 9647-3794 (Bus)               0466 27 27 22 (m)

See the Mordialloc website: www.mordiallocsc.com.au/

Mordi Newsletter for 22nd March ’14 * Issue 105

The Mordi Club Newsletter                                               22nd March 2014

Volume 5  –  No. 17                                                              Issue 105                                                                

For further details check out the club’s web site: www.mordiallocsc.com.au/

Ahead in this issue is:

Women & Girls in Sailing       An Adventure of Sorts to Shires Unknown (read Sabre Report)                               What’s Coming Up

Women & Girls in Sailing

“On February 28th, MSC hosted its first annual WGIS dinner with guest speakers Rosemary Colahan and Allicia Rae. The Women and Girls in Sailing Initiative strives to encourage women and girls to get involved in the sport of sailing and to build a safe and supportive community both within our sailing club and in the broader sailing community here in Victoria. MSC encourages and promotes women and girls in leadership roles and we were lucky to have many female role models and community contributors at this special dinner.
The night was made extra special with an amazing meal catered by the Free Burma Cafe – helping members of the Burmese refugee community settle here in Australia by offering employment, training and a sense of belonging in their new home. Many thanks to Cassy Rae, our MSC WGIS rep, and the members of the MSC social committee for organizing a memorable night.”

Contribution provided by Eminent Major Events Reporter Sarah Livesey

(See posters around the club/contact Cassy/Ann-Maree)

  • 6th April & 31st May – One day leadership training @ The Boat Shed – Albert Park – Contact YV or The Boat Shed
  • Start Powerboat Course – www.boatingvistoria.com.au P= 9597-0066

Sailing Skills Article

This is the first of four articles submitted by Colin White- source –The Internet.

Starting in a Big Fleet

Obviously the most important part of the race is the start because this determines your race strategy, especially on the first beat. The priority is to get clear air, have good speed and most importantly, go the right way up the first beat. If you get it all right the chances of a good position around the first mark are greatly increased making the rest of the race a lot easier. You should try an work the hardest for the first 100 metres in an effort to get clear of all the boats around you. In light winds this means concentrating extra hard, in the strong winds it means really working the boat hard.

Starting Points to Remember: Get there early. Check wind and tide. Check start bias. Take a starboard and a port tack from line, check transit, watch for shifts of line after you have taken the transit. Decide where on the line to start (consider wind shifts, tide, other boats). Be prepared to protect your water during the final two minutes. Especially if in the middle of the line check your transit (generally there is a large sag). Do NOT end up on the second or third row. Clear air is more important than being at the favoured end but in the second or third row (the bias is generally small). If over the line 3-5 seconds before the start (especially at the port end) be prepared to bail quick and dip boats to get to clear air. Never start to windward of a boat you know points higher or to leeward of a boat you know is faster. Try and sheet on with about seven seconds to go otherwise it is often difficult to get clear air. It is usually better to start just to leeward of the bunch as this reduces the level of risk in getting a good start. Don’t get caught too close to the pin – it is better to get a safe start then no start at all. Remember that if you get buried at the pin end of the start you must dip a lot of sterns to get clear air. Defend your space on the line HARD!!!

Sailing Upwind

The most important part of a yacht race after the start, is to pick the first two wind shifts correctly then to settle into the longest tack on the upwind leg of the course, this will generally position yourself with a loose cover over the bulk of the fleet and will leave you closest to the top mark.

To sail this part well you have to reach your best boat speed for the wind and sea conditions, note this can only be achieved in clean air. To reach your best boat speed there are a number of adjustments that can be altered “on” and “off” the water to make your boat go faster and

also easier to sail. It is very important that all these controls are easy to use and strong enough that they will not break under load.

These Include Batten weight. Boom vang tension. Mainsheet tension. Traveller position. Cunningham. Outhaul. Mast rake. Centreboard position (movement fore and aft). Mast bend (stiffener), hounds height. Sail size/shape. Gooseneck position. Hiking.

The most important part of making the boat go fast upwind comes back to the person holding the tiller. It’s all very well coming in after a race and blaming your sail/mast/rudder, where nine times put of ten it’s your fault! The minute you realise that you are at fault, you will begin to improve.

“Realise you are at fault, you will begin to improve.”

Points to Remember Sail the shifts. Remember tidal influence. Play the middle unless one side is clearly favoured (remember one side gives a 50% chance of leading or losing). If possible avoid lee bow tacks. Dip if you can’t, this keeps your options open and avoids potential protest situations. Clear air is vital. Do not get to the lay lines too early (you lose the option to tack on wind shifts and you lose clear air as boats tack on the lay line ahead of you). Do not leave your approach on port tack to the windward mark lay line till the last 2 or 3 boat lengths also be prepared to dip, losing a few is better than losing 20, 30 or 40 if you don’t lay the mark. If in front stay between the opposition and the top mark.

Contribution provided by Technical Skills Expert Reporter Colin White

Laser Report

Victorian Laser State Championships

Morgan Stewart Wins from MSC wins the Victorian Laser State Championship Title in 4.7 Division

Morgan Stewart collected her first highly coveted  Laser Cube and became the Victorian  State Champion in the Laser Open 4.7 Ladies Division during the weekend.

The championships were hosted by the  Mordialloc Sailing Club (MSC) and sailed in winds ranging from 15 -22 with the odd 30 knot gusts.

Morgan is an enthusiastic member of the  Laser 4.7    MSC Training Squad which is conducted under the guidance of coach Pat Hutton each Saturday morning.    Training has been mostly conducted in the heavier breezes and although difficult to master, Morgan’s efforts paid off handsomely  during the weekend.    And what a result for the MSC Laser Training team;  a State Champion in its first year!!.     Well done Morgan and all team participants.

The following MSC sailors also competed in the Laser Open Championships Cameron Parsons (11th Overall)   Malcolm Parsons (12th Overall) Chris Meager (20th Overall) and Yuri Tickanov (24 Overall) in the Laser Radial Division.    For Yuri this was his first championship and he might not have picked a tougher one.   The battle of the Parsons, was as expected, won comprehensively by Cameron which in effect confirmed the passing of the baton.  Nev Beeson and Mike Champness were  entrants  in the Open Full Rig Division  finishing a creditable  7th and 8th and thus being the highest placed MSC sailors in the senior divisions.

Contribution provided by Laser Class Reporter Nev Beeson

“Keep The Day Free Notice” – Presentation Afternoon/Night

Please keep this date free for the end of year Presentations. It is the culmination of the years sailing and recognition to those who have participated in the years events.

If last year’s event was any indication, 2014 will be terrific. More details will be provided over the next few weeks

What’s Coming Up

  • Saturday 22nd March 2014 – Tackers 1 & 3, Green Fleet, Laser 4.7 & Opti Coaching, Club Summer Series + COFFEE CRUISE
  • Saturday 29th March 2014 – Tackers 1 & 3, Green Fleet, Laser 4.7 & Opti Coaching, Club Summer Series + SABRE Teams Racing
  • Saturday 5th April 2014 – Tackers 1 & 3, Green Fleet, Laser 4.7 & Opti Coaching, Club Summer Series + WORKING BEE @ 8:00AM
  • Saturday 12th April 2014 – Green Fleet, Club Summer Series + COFFEE CRUISE + SCHOOL HOLIDAY PROGRAM for 4 days
  • Saturday 19th April 2014 – Easter Break – No sailing
  • Saturday 26th April 2014 – ANZAC DAY
  •  
  • Saturday 3rd May 2014 – Special events and Presentation Afternoon/Evening – Details to be provided.

Newsletter deadline

The ‘stop’ date for all articles is Mid-day every Wednesday

Photos to include JPG format.

The Editor’s Contact Details:

My email address is:  peter.d.white@boeing.com

Peter White  –  Sabre 1750

Ph: 9647-3794 (Bus)               0466 27 27 22 (m)

See the Mordialloc website: www.mordiallocsc.com.au/